Canadian prisons living conditions

CANADA’S PRISONS

The Correctional Service of Canada runs under the motto “To grasp the future”. It was formed on December 21, 1978. Its preceding agencies were the Canadian Penitentiary Service (CPS) and the National Parole Service.

Its headquarters are in Ottawa, Ontario. It is responsible for the rehabilitation and incarceration of convicted criminal offenders sentenced to two years or more.

It came to being when Queen Elizabeth II signed authorization for the newly commissioned agency. The commissioner of the Correctional Service of Canada is recommended for appointment by the Prime Minister and approved by an Order in Council.

An internal Corrections audit reports that parole officers are overwhelmed and are therefore unable to do all of the crucial collateral checks in the community.

Police officers have also complained that when parole violators are apprehended, they are often immediately re-released back on parole. In the end, these former inmates end up not being reformed since they do not have officers to keep them in check.

The auditor general also reported on Tuesday, May 6, 2014 that Canadian prison overcrowding is going to get worse in long-term. The prisons are so jam packed with inmates that many are forced to sleep in twos in s hared cells.

This breeds violence and poses a risk to offenders and staff at the facilities. The prisons are particularly overcrowded in Ontario and the Prairie Provinces. Jails in British Columbia and the Atlantic provinces have available space.

This has led to the costly consequence of transferring prisoners. In 2010 it cost $1.5 million to move 539 inmates. A cost that may have been avoided by expanding the available institutions.

Many other problems may be affecting the prison department but they are inevitable and can be solved. As long as the available institutions serve the intended purpose, all will be well.