How did the great northern war end, who won and the causes

Great northern war summary

The Great Northern War that lasted a total of 21 years from 1700 to 1721 was a conflict in which the Tsardom of Russia led a coalition to contest the supremacy of the Swedish Empire in Central, Northern and Eastern Europe. The war started when the alliance of Denmark-Norway, Saxony and Russia declared war on the Swedish empire.

Causes of the great northern war

Sweden was ruled by the young Charles XII who was 18 years old and inexperienced. The attackers therefore took advantage of this and decided to attack the Swedish empire. The opposition of the Swedish joined forces and became strong enough to fight Sweden. The war ended with Sweden’s defeat leaving Russia as the new dominant power.

The Swedish state proved unable to support and maintain its army in a prolonged war. The cost of the war proved more than the supporting countries could manage. Russia however was able to mobilize a larger army, but could not put all of it into action simultaneously.

Who won the great northern war

The mobilization system was however ineffective and the expanding nation needed to be defended in many locations. Peter the Great who led the Russians saw that his acquisition of an outlet at either the Black Sea or the Baltic Sea would make his territory stronger. This became his main goal, which he finally achieved.

At some point, the young King Charles had to exit Sweden and ran to Turkey where after sometime was no longer welcome. He was facing a difficult period when his kingdom was undergoing assimilation. Treaties were signed between Sweden and various countries such as Denmark. Finally, a treaty ending the war was signed between Russia and Sweden on August 30, 1721. This marked the end of the Great Northern War.