What are English prisons like descriptive essay

BRITISH PRISONS

British prisons just like any other in the world are established with an aim of providing rehabilitation and a chance for to begin a new life to criminals. Upon entry into a British prison, one is given the rules and guidelines of the prison.

Their property is the apprehended, booked and stored until the end of the individual’s jail term. The individual is then offered uniform and placed into an individual cell where he/she is required to spend their time unless during the day where they may have group activities such as sports or meal times.

Between 1993-2012, prison population in England and Wales more than doubled rising from 41,800 to over 86,000. This led to overcrowding in jails in the region with just a few having available spaces.

Effects of overcrowding go beyond lack of comfortability. The health status of the inmates is threatened as well as security of each individual. Some are even forced to “double bunk” which at first is not to be a permanent situation but in the end, prisoners are forced to share jail cells as well as beds. Overcrowding is getting steadily worse: 77 of 119 prisons in England and Wales are overcrowded.

Fears are growing that Britain’s jails are becoming a hotbed of extremism after it was revealed that nearly half of the inmates are Muslim. 42% of those housed at Category A Whitemoor jail and more than a quarter of those in London prisons consider themselves of Islamic faith.

A 2012 probe into the jail branded it a ‘Taliban recruiting ground’ and said that inmates were offered protection if they converted to the religion.

The British government has a greater issue to tackle other than overcrowding and insecurity. The rise of extremism in their jails.