Topic: Compare the themes in “The Lottery” and “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.”

Topic:  Compare the themes in “The Lottery” and “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.”

Thesis Statement:  The requirements for following deep-rooted traditions that are motivated by fear become problematic in both “The Lottery” and “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas,” resorting to undesirable outcomes. 

Formal Outline

  1. Symbolisms
  2. “The Lottery”
  3. The stones
  4. The black box
  5. “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas”
  6. The suffering child
  7. The darkness
  8. Deep-rooted traditions
  9. Culture and beliefs passed down
  10. Routine activities
  11. Requirements
  12. Ethics and Morals
  13. Understanding right from wrong
  14. Origins of questionable activities
  15. Outcomes
  16. Ritual benefits
  17. Sad reality
  18. Selfishness
  19. Looking beyond tradition
  20. Fearing the unknown
  21. Putting aside personal belief

Research Paper Notes

Source 1:

Collins, Jerre.  “Leaving Omelas: Questions of Faith and Understanding.”  Studies in Short

            Fiction, vol. 27, no. 4, Fall 1990, p. 525.

Paraphrase:

The understanding of a prosperous society shows that the people of Omelas are not a barbaric people but the suffering of one child for the sake of happiness for a group of people is an attempt to illuminate “universal truths about life” (Collins 526).

Summary:

 The author to this article is trying to get the reader to understand the individual characteristic mindsets. How they “war within themselves” to go against their morals and follow a cult almost religious tradition (Collins 528).

Quote:

 Even though the author of Omelas states there is no guilt in the towns people, the reaction the people have for the suffering child states otherwise (Collins 529).

Long Set-Off Quote:

 The author of this article continues to talk about how the story of Omelas is split into two distinct parts.

The first part goes into much detail about the town and the people of Omelas how they are a happy joyous bunch. The second part of the story stresses the immoral and disgusting conditions that the suffering child must live in (Collins 528).

Source 2:

Jackson, Shirley.  “The Lottery.”  Ed. X.J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia.  Literature:  An

            Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing.  13 ed.  Boston:  Pearson, 2016.

            254-259.

Paraphrase:

The author of “The Lottery” often uses foreshadowing to help the reader understand the complexity of the moral dilemma and cultic following of traditions.

Summary:

Shirley Jackson’s use of symbolism throughout the story represents the ideas of deep-rooted traditions and its connection with “irony” (Jackson 258).

Quote:

The thought-provoking use of sinister symbols in the story, allows us to understand even today, the troublesome existence of following traditions that can be harmful.

Long Set-Off Quote:

The villagers don’t have factual reasoning for keeping with the traditions of the lottery, nor do they understand the origins from which it came.

The following of such traditions religiously, accounts for the fear the villagers have for change. They are afraid that change may cause unsatisfactory results in their town and in their daily lives. 

Source 3:

Le Guin, Ursula.  “The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas.”  Ed. X.J. Kennedy and

            Dana Gioia.  Literature:  An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing.

            13 ed.  Boston:  Pearson, 2016. 249-253.

Paraphrase:

The child’s suffering is connected with the people’s happiness. After describing the rationality of the child, the author explains that those who come visit the child, mostly young people, come to terms with what they see.

Summary:

Even though the author describes the town of Omelas, most of the imagery is left to the readers imagination. The town sounds like an exuberantly happy place but the thought of the existence of the suffering child seems to be on everyone’s mind.

Quote:

The author continues to talk about the condition of the child and how some of the towns people come to see the child to either acknowledge its “very existence” or feel mixed emotions about the poor child’s suffering (Le Guin 251). 

Long Set-Off Quote:

In the end, it talks about how some of the people mostly young cannot come to grips with this horrific tradition, so they leave.

They gather their emotions and walk out of the gate of Omelas. It doesn’t say exactly where they are headed but it only states they “walk into the darkness” and “do not come back” (Le Guin 253).

Source 4:

Shields, Patrick J.  “Arbitrary Condemnation and Sanctioned Violence in Shirley Jackson’s “The

            Lottery.”  Contemporary Justice Review, vol. 7, no. 4, Dec 2004, p. 411-419.

Paraphrase:

The author of this article uses a connection between “sanctioned violence” and todays polices on capital punishment (Shields 412).

Summary:

The author uses the phrase “ritual cleansing” to conform to the evil that is present in human nature (Shields 412).

Quote:

Some characters are set out to make statements, others are “nameless” and “faceless” almost robotic in their following and participation in a sinister and almost sadistic ritual. (Shields 415). 

Long Set-Off Quote:

The story is set in more of a third person point of view.

The narrator doesn’t draw any attention to themselves. Rather, they allow the reader to “disappear into the crowd” making our own assumptions, judgements, and conclusions of the villagers and of “The Lottery” (Shields 415).

Works Cited

Collins, Jerre.  “Leaving Omelas: Questions of Faith and Understanding.”  Studies in Short

            Fiction, vol. 27, no. 4, Fall 1990, p. 525.

Jackson, Shirley.  “The Lottery.”  Ed. X.J. Kennedy and Dana Gioia.  Literature:  An

            Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing.  13 ed.  Boston:  Pearson, 2016.

            254-259.

Le Guin, Ursula.  “The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas.”  Ed. X.J. Kennedy and

            Dana Gioia.  Literature:  An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing.

            13 ed.  Boston:  Pearson, 2016. 249-253.

Shields, Patrick J.  “Arbitrary Condemnation and Sanctioned Violence in Shirley Jackson’s “The

            Lottery.”  Contemporary Justice Review, vol. 7, no. 4, Dec 2004, p. 411-419.

Type of service-Academic paper writing
Type of assignment-Research Paper
Subject-English
Pages / words-4 / 1100
Number of sources-0
Academic level-Sophomore (College 2nd year)
Paper format-MLA
Line spacing-Double
Language style-US English

benefits of our essay help